Blog 44: The Language And Terminology We Use In Writing.

I already touched on this topic in Blog 37: On The Importance Of Words, but I wanted to write more about the language and terminology that we use.

As a writer getting the language and terminology right for your characters, setting, plot and storyline is important. The writers who nail this often have the best-selling novels, whilst the writers who don’t, often trail behind. Now that’s not to say that every best-selling novel is a good book and every other book is bad, but you can definitely tell when a book is more likely to be good, based on the language and terminology that the author uses.

Language and terminology can be used to add colour and complexity to your characters without compromising on your word count. Sticking to stereotypes for now, the evilness of your antagonists can be increased with the language and terminology that they use. If their language is mean, cold, and/or condescending, it is likely that the reader will ‘dislike’ these characters. Similarly, the goodness of your protagonists can be amplified by the honesty, good-will and politeness that may shine through in how they speak and interact with other characters. Not only this, but the language and terminology used by characters when they talk about other characters, can be used to paint pictures and nudge the reader’s opinions of those other characters. This happens all the time in real life, you see it in advertising, music, the media, and pretty much every single thing that is written, everyone has an opinion and their own lives, and naturally this will come through in their work, their mannerisms and what they say, even if they’re not aware of it. read more »

Blog 37: On The Importance Of Words.

When I was in high school and studying English Literature, we read books like ‘Of Mice And Men’ and ‘An Inspector Calls’. One day that I remember clearly, a student asked the English teacher why we were bothering to study the sentences in such detail. This student was sure that writers would not and did not plan every single sentence they wrote. They thought that if a writer chose to write that the curtains were blue then they simply were blue and that it was not a subtle attempt at drawing out feelings of sadness from the reader. My teacher didn’t have a reply at the time, but after writing a book, reading hundreds of other books and many years later, I do have a reply. read more »

Blog 35: Ten Tips On Writing A Short Story.

Outlet Publishing and their team have kindly asked me to help judge their short story competition, and even though I haven’t written a short story myself, yet, and I’m certainly no expert. I am an avid reader and I have been through the writing and publication process, so I do feel in my humble opinion that I have a basic understanding of what works and what doesn’t.

Over the past two months I have read dozens of entries written by young, hopeful candidates. Some have been very good, others not so, but as the entries have been piling up around me I have noticed similarities and reoccurring patterns. The same mistakes have been cropping up again and again, and there appears to be a preference towards particular genres and themes. The latter is neither strictly bad nor good, but the former is most definitely bad. With this in mind, I am going to share with you some insight into what I feel short story competition judges are looking for, and hopefully help you and your short stories shoot to the top of the winning pile.

 

Tip Number 1: Read The Rules.

This may seem obvious, but make sure you read the competition’s specifications, rules and guidelines. I don’t know if it was because candidates couldn’t be bothered to read the rules or if they simply misread them, but a couple of the short story submissions I have recently received didn’t sit within the required word count. Judges may be able to forgive a word count that falls 10% above or below the maximum and minimum requirement, but if your story is more than 10% above or below then don’t submit it. Also, some competitions state a specific age range or country of residence, so make sure you read everything carefully before submitting your work.

Tip Number 2: Quality Over Quantity. read more »

Blog 32: An Interview with ‘In the Depths of Darkness’ Author Sean Fletcher

Image result for in the depths of darkness sean fletcherQ1) Briefly, how would you describe ‘In the Depths of Darkness’ to someone who hasn’t read any of your previous work?

In the Depths of Darkness follows a group of outcasts blackmailed into joining the oppressive Earth Alliance army, only to discover they’re the test subjects for an advanced neural Chip that will make them into super soldiers. If they survive. But once the rest of the galaxy finds out they have the Chip, they are forced to go on the run and find somewhere—anywhere—safe.

It’s a YA Star Wars meets Firefly with some Ender’s Game thrown in.

Q2) How long did it take for you to finish and publish ‘In the Depths of Darkness’?

This was my most ambitious project to date. Book one took me about six months to write and do my edits on. Then another 2-3 months to have readers/editors take a look and input their edits. I was actually done with it near the middle of 2016, but I held off to release it so I could get the second one started. I haven’t released Book 2 yet, but it’s done, and I have just a little editing left before letting other people look at it. read more »

Blog 25: An Interview with ‘Consensus Breaking’ author, M.S. Dobing

Consensus Breaking 2

Q1) In one or two sentences, how would you describe your novel ‘Consensus Breaking’ to someone who hasn’t read any of your previous work?

Think an urban fantasy of the Matrix! It’s the sequel in the Auran Chronicles, and follows a young protagonist — Seb — who’s pulled into a secret world within our own where sheol (terrifying daemons that can possess humans) battle the warriors and mages of the Brotherhood and Magistry. In Consensus Breaking the fallout from the events of book one continue, with Seb and his alllies facing a new foe that not only serves as an entirely new level of adventure and threat, but also  serves to delve deeper into the underlying mythology and scale of the Auran Chronicles universe.

Q2) How long did it take for you to finish and publish ‘Consensus Breaking’?

It took about 6 months, which included first draft, multiple edits, a professional edit, and then final rewrite.

Q3) Have you always wanted to write and when did you first discover that you wanted to write? read more »

Blog 21: Social Media for Authors, Writers and Readers.

blog 21

I’ve scoured Facebook, Twitter, Youtube and the internet for groups, pages, blogs, channels and websites specifically aimed at authors, writers and readers. I’ve picked out a few and listed them below to help you get started, but there are plenty more out there to choose from…

facebook logoFacebook pages & groups for Authors/Writers

BooksGoSocial Author’s Group

BooksGoSocial Book Review Club

The Writer’s Circle

Writers’ Group

Writers Write read more »